LGBTQIA Resources

There are many LGBTQ resources available to you! Click on the links below to discover the LGBTQ resources on campus, in the Los Angeles area and nationwide. If there are resources that are not listed on our site please send an email to lgbt@ucla.edu

LGBT 101 & Ally Resources

LGBT 101

Terminology

List of LGBTQ Terminology:
Each of these definitions has been carefully researched and closely analyzed from theoretical and practical perspectives for cultural sensitivity, common usage, and general appropriateness. We have done our best to represent the most popular uses of the terms listed; however there may be some variation in definitions depending on location.

GLAAD Media Reference Guide - Transgender Glossary of Terms:
This page is part of GLAAD's Media Reference Guide, a guide for journalists. This list is not by any means exhaustive or universal.

Neutrois:
A website that defines what the term "neutrois" means and which identities fall underneath.

Education

Coming Out on Campus:
A brochure on tips and resources for coming out.

American Psychological Association:
Answers to Your Questions About Transgender Individuals and Gender Identity

American Psychological Association:
Answers to Your Questions About Individuals With Intersex Conditions

American Psychological Association:
Answers to Your Questions For A Better Understanding of Sexual Orientation and Homosexuality

Research

Advocates For Youth:
Research shows that homophobia and heterosexism greatly contribute to GLBTQ youth's high rates of attempted and completed suicide, violence victimization, substance abuse, teenage pregnancy, and HIV-associated risky behaviors.

Advocates For Youth:
The Impact of Homophobia and Racism on GLBTQ Youth of Color

Ally Resources

Education and Information

Guide to Being a Straight Ally:
The LGBT community cannot achieve equality without support from smart, energic, compassionate, and dedicated straight allies...people just like you. We know that there are lots of barriers that may keep people from getting involved, and that's why we're here. This booklet is the first to getting past them.

HRC's An Ally's Guide to Issues Facing LGBT Americans:
This is a primer for allies that introduces the major areas in which LGBT Americans face challenges in fully participating in life and provides a summary of what advocates are doing to work for change.

Advocacy Organizations

GSA: Gay-Straight Alliance Network:
Gay-Straight Alliance Network is a national youth leadership organization that connects school-based Gay-Straight Alliances (GSAa) to each other and community resources through peer support, leadership development and training.

Human Rights Campaign:
Allies/Safe Zone Program

PFLAG:
PFLAG is the nation's largest family and ally organization. Made up of parents, families, friends and straight allies united with people who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT), PFLAG is committed to advancing equality and societal acceptance of LGBT people through its threefold mission of support, education and advocacy.

Straight For Equality:
PFLAG's newest project aims to reach out to people who don't have a close family connection to the issue of LGBT equality, but who want to help. For them, Straight For Equality will be an invitation to our movement and a chance to get the tools they need to become supportive.

Family-Oriented

Atticus Circle:
Atticus Circle educates and mobilizes straight people to advance equal rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) partners, parents, and their children.

School-Related

Athlete Ally:
Athlete Ally is a nonprofit organization focused on ending homophobia and transphobia in sports by educating allies in the athletic community and empowering them to take a stand. Athlete Ally also provides public awareness campaigns, educational programming, and tools and resources to foster inclusive sports communities.

Campus Pride:
Campus Pride represents the leading national nonprofit organization for student leaders and campus groups working to create a safer college environment for LGBT students. The organization is a volunteer-driven network 'for' and 'by' student leaders.

Consortium of Higher Education:
The combined vision and mission of the Consortium is to achieve higher education environments in which lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender students, faculty, staff, administrators, and alumni have equity in every respect.

GLSEN: Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network:
At GLSEN, we want every student, in every school, to be valued and treated with respect, regardless of their sexual orientation, gender identity or gender expression. We believe that all students deserve a safe and affirming school environment where they can learn and grow.

LGBTQ Artitect:
Welcome to LGBTQArtitect. This website will guide you through documentation for campus administrators working with LGBTQ populations. Use these documents to construct a program for yourself.

 

Coming Out Resources

UC and Campus-Specific Resources

Coming Out on Campus:
A brochure on tips and resources for coming out.

Identity Resources

Human Rights Campaign's Guide to Coming Out

Be Yourself: Questions and Answers for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Youth 

Gender-Specific

I Think I Might Be Transgender, What Do I Do?

Workshops by the Gay & Lesbian Center to provide support and guidance:

Coming Out Workshop for Women

Coming Out Workshop for Men

Sexuality-Specific

Brochures dedicated to aiding you on your coming out journey:
I Think I Might Be Lesbian, What Do I Do?
I Think I Might Be Gay, What Do I Do?
I Think I Might Be Bisexual, What Do I Do?
Getting Bi in a Gay/Straight World

Education and Information

The Coming Out Course:
Created to help LGBTQ youth, facing homophobia and transphobia, to determine their own coming out process, build a support network, and have a plan for negative reactions.

Coming out for Youth:
The Gay & Lesbian Center's workshop for coming out for youth.

Communities

Q&A Space:
Our goal is to provide API LGBT youth who do wish to come out and are struggling with the process with linguistically appropriate and culturally confident tools and resources to come out to whomever they'd like at whatever time they're comfortable. When we see the diversity and depth of experiences of Asian Pacific Islander LGBT people, we can grow closer as a community.

Transgender Resources

UC and Campus-Specific Resources

(Please also visit the Trans @ UCLA tab)

Campus Support

TransUP:
UCLA’s Transgender and genderqueer‐centered group that focuses on finding social equality through discussions and advocacy.  To learn more, please email transuclapride@gmail.com.

Medical Services & UC SHIP Coverage

All UC campuses offer the same benefits for trans* students, including, doctor visits, travel and procedures. Hormones are covered under the prescription plan and counseling is provided by the Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) office.

For more specific information regarding insurance, please read the UC SHIP Benefit Bookletor contact Barbara Rabinowitz, Student Insurance Manager at the Ashe Student Health Center. She can be reached at (310) 825-3416 or brabinowitz@ashe.ucla.edu.

UC Employee Benefits

As of July 1, 2005, UC’s employee insurers (with the exception of Western Health Advantage, which insures relatively few UC employees) began offering coverage of certain transgender-related surgical needs. While print materials regarding the coverage are not yet available, UC employees and their covered family members should feel free to call their insurer’s member services department with questions about the coverage, since the insurers indicate they have trained their customer services staff in this regard. Should they have additional questions, employees are encouraged to call the UCOP staff member who helped negotiate the coverage: Joan Manning, 510-987-0746. UC health insurers for employees also offer hormone therapy and psychological counseling. 

For more information, please visit the University of California Lesbian, Gay Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Association.

Mental Health Services

UCLA Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS):

In addition to individual services, CAPS provides a range of programs to promote mental health, emotional resilience and wellness throughout the campus community. Appointments can be made in person or over the phone by calling (310)825-0768.

To meet with a counselor, please schedule a 15 minute screening appointment and ask for a therapist who specializes in gender identity concerns.  Alternatively, you can contact the following counselors directly to set up an appointment:

Amanda di Bartolomeo - adibartolomeo@caps.ucla.edu
Saeromi Kim - skim@caps.ucla.edu
Dee Chappelear - dchappelear@caps.ucla.edu

Gender Identity Spectrum Support Group

The gender identity spectrum support group welcomes students who are exploring and/or identify ans transgender, gender fluid, and gender nonconforming in their identity and expression.  Relevant issues to be addressed include:

challenges around coming out negotiating gendered environments establishing identity-affirming relationships coping with gender binary norms accessing health and social services supportive of transgender people addressing issues related to the transitioning process

If interested or if you have questions, please contact Saeromi Kim, Ph.D. at CAPS at (310) 825-0768 or email skim@caps.ucla.edu

Education & Information

Trans 101:

Terminology and Frequently Asked Questions

I Think I Might Be Transgender, Now What Do I Do?

Coming Out as a Transgender Person:
This workbook is designed to assist in your journey of coming out to family and friends as a transgender person. This material is not intended to be an exhaustive resource, but a review of current information and suggestions, as well as a series of organized to help you navigate this journey.

Pronoun Dressing Room:
Pick your pronouns and try them on.

Gender Neutral Restrooms:

UCLA Campus Map of Gender Neutral Restrooms

Refuge Restrooms:
REFUGE seeks to provide safe restroom access for transgender, intersex, and gender non-confirming individuals. When the Safe2Pee website passed out of functionality, it left a hole. Refuge seeks to, once again, provide a valuable resource for trans and queer individuals who find themselves in need of a safe restroom to use.

Learning Trans:

Learning Trans is a project, the goal of which is to produce, and to highlight trans community-produced knowledge.

We Happy Trans*:

A web and video series that provides space for sharing positive trans experiences. We Happy Trans* welcomes stories and input from the community.

Project TMOC:

Youtube video channel of 14 Transgender Men of Color of all different ages, from all different walks of life sharing their experiences and opinions living as Men of Color during their Transitions. 

International Foundation for Gender Education:

IFGE promotes acceptance for transgender people. We advocate for freedom of gender expression and promote the understanding and acceptance of All People: Transgender, Cis-gender, Transsexual, Crossdresser, Agender, Gender Queer, Intersex, Two Spirit, Hijra, Kathoey, Drag King, Drag Queen, Queer, Lesbian, Gay, Straight, Butch, Femme, Faerie, Homosexual, Bisexual, Heterosexual, and of course - You!

 

FTM International:

The Voice of FTMs throughout the world. FTM International and cognate groups have represented FTMs at numerous events worldwide, informing and educating diverse communities about our lives.

Higher Education Resources

TONI Project:

The Transgender On-campus Nondiscrimination Information (TONI) Project is the first-of-its-kind space for students to share college and university policies important to transgender people, and organize for policy change on campus.

Trans-Academics.org:

A place where people of all genders can discuss gender theory, the trans community and its various identities, both as a part of the academic world and day-to-day life. The listserv is not currently active, but there is an archive of information.

Los Angeles Community Organizations

FTM Alliance of Los Angeles:

A community-based organization dedicated to empowering the female-to-male [FTM] transgender community, and to increasing the visibility and acceptance of FTMs in Southern California.

Gender Justice LA:

A Los Angeles based non-profit organization working to build the collective power of the transgender community. We operate several programs, including a campaign for affordable quality healthcare, advocacy and education, and community wellness programs.

TransSolidarity:
Building solidarity among transgender and gender queer people, partners, parents, families, and allies in Los Angeles.

The Los Angeles LGBT Center:

The Los Angeles LGBT Centers’s broad array of services for the entire LGBT community includes many programs developed specifically to meet the needs of both MTF (male-to-female) and FTM (female-to-male) transgender people, including job seeking, support groups, and legal services.

Lifeworks:

LifeWorks is the youth development and mentoring program of the LA Gay & Lesbian Center. We offer one on one, peer, and group mentoring opportunities for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer and questioning youth ages 12-24. Our goal is to help LGBTQ youth to realize their goals and dreams with a safe space, positive and affirming role models, and workshops & activities that are fun and educational.

South Bay Center:

The Lesbian, Gay, Bi & Transgender Community Organization is to provide a focal point for the members of our community in the South Bay for education, social interaction, personal growth, and political power, and to foster public understanding of our community.

SoCal Queer Events:

The goal of this site is to serve the queer, gender diverse, trans community and spread the word about public events in Southern California. These include social gatherings, political action, drag shows, support groups, and just about anything safe & open.

Trans* Athlete:
Trans* Athlete is a resource for students, athletes, coaches, and adminstrators to find information about trans* inclusion in athletics at various levels of play.

Mental Health Resources

UCLA Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS):

In addition to individual services, CAPS provides a range of programs to promote mental health, emotional resilience and wellness throughout the campus community. Our 24-hour telephone access line (310-825-0768) allows students, parents and other members of our campus community to receive counseling and consultation in the use of CAPS’s many offerings. Appointments can be made in person or over the phone. Additionally, CAPS offers a Gender Identity Spectrum Support Group--if you are interested please contact Dr. Saeromi Kim at skim@caps.ucla.edu.

The Trevor Project

The Trevor Project is determined to end suicide among LGBTQ youth by providing life-saving and life-affirming resources including our nationwide, 24/7 crisis intervention lifeline, digital community and advocacy/educational programs that create a safe, supportive and positive environment for everyone. If you are a youth who is feeling alone, confused or in crisis, please call The Trevor Lifeline at 1-866-488-7386 for immediate help.

Los Angeles Gender Center:

The Los Angeles Gender Center provides an environment of safety, support, and understanding for exploring gender and sexuality. We are eight experienced therapists who specialize in gender identity, transgender, gender expression, sexual orientation, sexuality, relationships, and intimacy. We assist adults, adolescents, children, and their families with facing the challenges and embracing the enrichment of exploring gender and sexuality.

The Los Angeles LGBT Center

The LA Gay & Lesbian Center provides sliding scale individual and group counseling. Transgender Perceptions is the peer-led, drop-in conversation group for men and women across the gender spectrum.  Common topics include coming out, the effects of hormone treatments, the emotional aspects of coming out, and what it can be like to be transgender in the workplace.) 

FTM Alliance Strong Minds:

FTM Alliance has a list of Southern California based therapists they update fairly regularly.

Additionally, they have two peer support groups that meet regularly (check the calendar for the next date or contact info@ftmalliance.org):

GUYS CHAT (meets on the third Sunday of every month at Plummer Park Community Center)--The Guys Chat is open to anyone assigned female at birth or in childhood who no longer feels that label is complete or accurate. (In other words…if you self-identify as trans, genderqueer, or if you are questioning, you’re welcome to attend!) Please do not bring friends or significant others to this meeting.

LOTS MEETING (meets on the third Sunday of every month at Plummer Park Community Center)--LOTS is a supportive space for partners, parents, friends, allies and others in relations with trans/genderqueer folks.

 

Medical/Physical Health Resources

Arthur Ashe Student Health & Wellness Center (ASHE):

The Arthur Ashe Student Health and Wellness Center provides comprehensive medical care for all registered UCLA students. We are committed to creating a nurturing and non-judgmental environment for all of our patients. We will coordinate care for our transgender students at any stage of their journey. Appointments can be scheduled through the patient portal, or by calling the center at 310-825-4073. Students enrolled in UC SHIP (the UC Student Health Insurance Plan) should verify the details of their insurance coverage by speaking with someone in the insurance department, or emailing insurshs@ashe.ucla.edu.

The Los Angeles LGBT Center

The Los Angeles LGBT Center provides a welcoming and accepting environment where you are free to be yourself. Dr. Maddie Deutsch, a leading expert in transgender health care, heads the Center’s Transgender Health Program, which provides comprehensive primary health care as well as trans-specific services.

Dr. Johanna Olson, Childrens’ Hospital Los Angeles:

Johanna Olson, MD is an Adolescent Medicine physician specializing in the care of transgender youth, gender variant children, youth with HIV, and chronic pain. 

Trans-Health:

A website that provides information on health and fitness for transgender and transsexual people.

TransGenderCare:

TransGenderCare contains a large archive of health information written and compiled from years of directly providing medical, psychological, electrology, and general health services to generations of transgender folk.

FTM Alliance Strong Bodies:

Guides on Medical Transition, health guides on HIV prevention and PAP tests, list of Southern California based Primary Care Providers & Endocrinologists, and names of surgeons, prosthetics businesses, menswear businesses.

Religious Resources

The Center for Lesbian and Gay Studies in Religion and Ministry:
The CLGS Transgender Religious Roundtable testifies to the transfigurational power of spirituality and nurture the full thriving and dignity of people of all genders.

Transfaith:
Transfaith is a national non-profit that is led by transgender people and focused on issues of faith and spirituality. We work closely with many allied organizations, secular, spirituality and religious, transgender-led and otherwise. 

Advocacy Organizations

Advocates for Youth:
Advocates for Youth champions efforts to help young people make informed and responsible decisions about their reproductive and sexual health. Advocates believes it can best serve the field by boldly advocating for a more positive and realistic approach to adolescent sexual health.

Gender Justice LA:

Gender Justice LA is building a strong grassroots multi-racial coalition of transgender people and allies to advocate for our rights, win concrete improvements in our lives, and challenge oppression.

Transgender Resource Center of New Mexico:
The Transgender Resource Center of New Mexico provides a wide range of support and educational services to trans people and their allies in New Mexico and beyond. Our services range from support groups to a speakers' bureau, to educational programs for medical and social service providers.

Trans People of Color Coalition:

Trans People of Color Coalition (TPOCC) is the only national social justice organization that promotes the interest of Trans People of Color. TPOCC is an organization to inspire and nurture collaboration among communities of color dedicated to anti-racism and fighting transphobia and the empowerment of transgender persons of color. We work to strengthen and mobilize individuals, families, and communities by changing laws, educating the public, and building social and economic strength among all persons of color. Find out more on theirFacebook page.

Transgender Law and Policy Institute (TLPI):

The TLPI brings experts and advocates together to work on law and policy initiatives designed to advance transgender equality.

The Brown Boi Project:

A community of masculine of center womyn, men, two-spirit people, transmen, and allies committed to transforming our privilege of masculinity, gender, and race into tools for achieving Racial and Gender Justice. The Brown Boi Project Leadership Retreats are designed for young leaders (35 and under) that have fewer than 7 years of experience in their field and are looking to reinforce their potential with a strong foundation of skills and self-awareness. To apply please join our email list serv.

Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD):

GLAAD advocates for positive stories about transgender Americans in the news and on television programs. GLAAD also helps transgender people and allies across the country share their stories in their local communities. 

 

International Transgender Day of Remembrance:

The Transgender Day of Remembrance, which takes place in November, raises public awareness of hate crimes against transgendered people, an action that current media doesn’t perform. Through the vigil, we express love and respect for our people in the face of national indifference and hatred. Day of Remembrance reminds non-transgendered people that we are their sons, daughters, parents, friends and lovers. It gives our allies a chance to step forward with us and stand in vigil, memorializing those of us who’ve died by anti-transgender violence. For more info please visit the Facebook page.

National Center for Transgender Equality:

The National Center for Transgender Equality is a national social justice organization devoted to ending discrimination and violence against transgender people through education and advocacy on national issues of importance to transgender people. By empowering transgender people and our allies to educate and influence policymakers and others, NCTE facilitates a strong and clear voice for transgender equality in our nation's capital and around the country.

Injustice at Every Turn: A Report of the National Transgender Discrimination Survey:

The National Transgender Discrimination Survey, co-commissioned by the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force and the National Center for Transgender Equality, is the most extensive survey of transgender discrimination ever undertaken. The report contains detailed information about the discrimination faced by transgender people. They have also done a thorough analysis in three separate reports focusing on the issues and needs of African American, Latino, and Asian Pacific Islander respondents.

World Professional Association for Transgender Health:
As an international multidisciplinary profession Association the mission of The World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH) is to promote evidence based care, education, research, advocacy, public policy and respect in transgender health.

National Center for Transgender Equality:
The National Center for Transgender Eqaulity (NCTE) is a 501(c)3 social justice organization dedicated to advancing the equality of transgender people through advocacy, collaboration and empowerment

International Foundation for Gender Education:
IFGE promotes acceptance for transgender people. We advocate for freedom of gender expression and promote the understanding and acceptance of All People.

Legal Services

Transgender Legal Defense & Education Fund (TLDEF):

TLDEF is committed to ending discrimination based upon gender identity and expression and to achieving equality for transgender people through public education, test-case litigation, direct legal services, community organizing and public policy efforts.

National Center for Transgender Equality:
The NCTE is a 501(c)3 social justice organization dedicated to advancing the equality of transgender people through advocacy, collaboration and empowerment.

Transgender Law Center:

Transgender Law Center works to change law, policy, and attitudes so that all people can live safely, authentically, and free from discrimination regardless of their gender identity or expression.

Transgender Law & Policy Institute:
TLPI is a non-profit organization dedicated to engaging in effective advocacy for transgender people in our society. The TLPI brings experts and advocates together to work on law and policy initiatives designed to advance transgender equality.

Sylvia Rivera Law Project:

We provide legal services, such as advice, direct representation, and referral to other service providers - free of charge, on issues impacting transgender, gender non-conforming people, and intersex people.

CA Trans Law 101

Protecting the Rights of Transgender Parents and their Children

A guide for parents and lawyers that provides information to help protect parent-child relationships and assist them when faced with disputes over child custody issues.

Applying for Asylum based on Gender Identity Persecution

Legal Name Change Process for California

Court-Ordered Name Change:

  1. Fill out court forms (Form NC-100, NC-110NC-120NC-130, and CM-010).

  2. Make at least two copies of all your forms. 

  3. File your forms with the court clerk.  You will need to pay a filing fee ($395 in LA County, as of April 2012).  To find your local courthouse, visit  http://www.courts.ca.gov/find-my-court.htm.  Fee waivers are available: http://www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp-feewaiver.htm.  You will be assigned a court date to appear before a judge.

  4. Publish the Order to Show Cause for Change of Name (NC-120).  This must be posted in a newspaper for four consecutive weeks before your court date.  Ask your court for a list of approved publications.  The cost of publication can vary greatly among the various approved newspapers, so be sure to check the prices before submitting Form NC-120 to the courthouse.

  5. Attend your court date.  Bring a copy of Form NC-130 for the judge to sign, as well as proof that your Order to Show Cause was published in the newspaper.

  6. Get your Decree Changing Name from the Court.  It is advisable to get at least one or two certified copies.  You can use this to change your name on your birth certificate, Social Security card, and other government-issued identification.

Social Security

California Driver's License
California Birth Certificate

United States Passport

Relationship & Family Resources

TransOriented:
Transoriented.com has been established to provide an information resource and support group for men who have a sexual and emotional orientation towards transwomen. It also aims to humanize transoriented men in the public eye and to help family members and friends of transoriented men to get a better understanding of what it means to be transoriented.

TransYouth Family Allies:
TYFA empowers children and families by partnering with educators, service providers and communities to develop supportive environments in which gender may be expressed and respected. We envision a society free of suicide and violence in which ALL children are respected and celebrated.

Transgender Network (TNET):

PFLAG's Transgender Network (TNET) includes contacts and regional coordinators for all of our chapters around the country. Their primary mission is to educate our members and allies about transgender issues – including those parents and significant others experiencing the coming out of a loved one as transgender.

Gender Spectrum:

Gender Spectrum provides education, training and support to help create a gender sensitive and inclusive environment for all children and teens.

Kids of Transgender People (COLAGE):

COLAGE is a national movement of children, youth, and adults with one or more lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and/or queer (LGBTQ) parent/s. We build community and work toward social justice through youth empowerment, leadership development, education, and advocacy.

TMates Of Color:

Partners of FTM's of Color share their experiences and opinions in loving their partner during their transition while also recognizing their own journey.

LOTS MEETING (meets on the third Sunday of every month at Plummer Park Community Center)--LOTS is a supportive space for partners, parents, friends, allies and others in relations with trans/genderqueer folks.

Job Seeking

LA Gay & Lesbian Center Transgender Economic Empowerment Project:

Whether you want to find a job, brush up your job skills or educate co-workers about the transitioning process, the Center has the resources you need to thrive in the workplace.

FAQ’s for Transgender Job Seekers

Competency

World Professional Association for Transgender Health:

As an international multidisciplinary professional Association the mission of WPATH is to promote evidence based care, education, research, advocacy, public policy and respect in transgender health.

 

Bisexual Resources

Getting Bi in a Gay/Straight World

UC and Campus-Specific Resources

Fluid:
UCLA's discussion/social based group for bisexual/pansexual related issues.

Education and Information

Advocates for Youth's article: 
I Think I Might Be Bisexual, Now What Do I Do?

Bi/Pan/Fluid 101: 
Transcending Boundaries' Introduction to Bisexuality, Pansexuality, & Related Identities.

Communities

amBi:
A social/activity group for bisexual adults and friends across Greater Los Angeles.

Advocacy Organizations

Bisexual.org:
This site is a project designed to introduce our community to the world. With this site, the goal is to give a voice to the bisexual community, share accurate information, answer questions and provide resources for further learning.

The Bisexual Resource Center:
The BRC is the oldest national bisexual organization in the U.S. that advocates for bisexual visibility and raises awareness about bisexuality throughout the LGBT and straight communities.

Los Angeles Bi Task Force (LABTF):
A non-profit organization that promotes education, advocacy, and cultural enrichment for the bisexual/fluid/pansexual communities in the Los Angeles area, and aims to develop a future bisexual resource center.

BiNet USA:
As America's umbrella organization and voice for bisexual, pansexual, fluid, queer-identified and all other of us "somewhere in between" people as well as their lesbian, gay, transgender, "straight but not narrow" and questioing friends and allies, BiNet USA facilitates the development of a cohesive network of independent bisexual and bi-friendly communities; promotes bisexual, pansexual and bi-inclusive visibility; and collects and distribute educational information regarding sexual orientation and gender identity with an emphasis on the bisexual and pansexual and allied communities.

 

 

Lesbian and Bisexual Women's Resources

Education and Information

Advocates For Youth:
I Think I Might Be Lesbian, Now What Do I do?

Gay Lesbian Education Straight Network (GLSEN):
The 2013 National School Climate Survey

Communities

City of West Hollywood

One Archives:
This website is for the independent, community-partner of ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at the USC Libraries, the largest repository of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) materials in the world.

Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce (LAGLCC):
The Los Angeles Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce is a 501(c)(6) organization of gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and gay-allied businesses, professionals, and individuals, who have joined together to effect positive growth in ourselves, our work, our community and our future.

The Community of LGBT Centers:
CenterLink was founded in 1994 as a member-based coalition to support the development of strong, sustainable LGBT community centers. The organization plays an important role in supporting the growth of LGBT centers and addressing the challenges they face, by helping them to improve their organizational and service delivery capacity and increase access to public resources.

Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Scientists:
LAGLS provides a friendly, supportive social environment to technoqueers at meetings, field trips and special events; previously monthly, now 2-4 times a years.

Outdoor Activities

LA Pride

WeHo Aquatics

Women On A Roll:
A social organization that strives to enrich the lives of lesbians--both couples and singles alike. Its membership represents owmen of all ages, backgrounds, ethnicities, professions, and fitness levels and brings them together in a fun and relaxed environment. WOAR is also committed to supporting worthy causes and charities that are part of our diverse and wonderful community.

Los Angeles Frontrunner:
Is a running and walking club for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people (LGBT) and their friends and supports. We welcome runners and walkers of all levels, ethnic backgrounds and sexual identities.

Different Strokes Southern California:
This club was founded in 1983 to promote cycling activities among members and friends of the gay and lesbian communities in Southern California. We offer a wide variety of road and mountain bike rides, ranging from easy to advanced, throughout the greater Los Angeles Area.

Gay and Lesbian Sierrans:
GLS is an official activity section of the Sierra Club and fosters the purposes of the Sierra Club by making available a wide range of events for gays, lesbians and their friends and family.

Great Outdoors Los Angeles:
Great Outdoors is a non-profit, all-volunteer gay and lesbian organization dedicated to the enjoyment of outdoor recreation. We are the largest gay outdoor recreational organization in Southern California and include chapters in Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, Orange County/Long Beach, Palm Springs and San Diego.

Greater Los Angeles Softball Association (GLASA):
GLASA is a gay and lesbian slowpitch softball league committed to providing an organization for both gay and non-gay participates to compete in an environment conducive to the gay community. Our league ranges from people that have never thrown a ball to the most competitive players in the nation.

Advocacy Organizations

Advocates for Youth:
Advocates for Youth champions efforts to help young people make informed and responsible decisions about their reproductive and sexual health. Advocates believes it can best serve the field by boldly advocating for a more positive and realistic approach to adolescent sexual health.

Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice:
The Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice is the only philanthropic organization working exclusively to advance LGBTQI human rights around the globe. We support hundreds of brilliant and brave grantee partners in the U.S. and internationally who challenge oppression and seed change. We work for racial, economic, social, and gender justice, because we all deserve to live our lives freely, without fear, and with dignity.

Matthew Shepard Foundation:
The Foundation was founded by Dennis and Judy Shepard in memory of their 21-year-old son. Matthew, who was murdered in an anti-gay hate crime in Wyoming in October 1998. Created to honor his memory, the Foundation seeks to "Replace Hate with Understanding, Compassion, & Acceptance" through its varied educational, outreach, and advocacy programs.

National Center For Lesbian Rights:
The National Center for Lesbian Right (NCLR) has been advancing the civil and human rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people and their families through litigation, legislation, policy, and public education since it was founded in 1977.

GLMA - Health Professionals Advancing LGBT Equality:
GLMA is the world's largest and oldest association of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) healthcare professionals.

The Center Long Beach:
As a central core of the Greater Long Beach LGBTQ communities we offer assistance and provide education about emotional and physical health, housing, cultural and social activities, and legal and social justice. We advocate for the inclusion of all with no judgment or restrictions based on sexual orientation or gender identity.

Gay-Straight Alliance Network (GSAN):
A national youth leadership organization that connects school-based Gay-Straight Alliances to each other and community resources through peer support, leadership development, and training.

National Gay and Lesbian Task Force:
The Task Force creates change by building LGBT political power from the ground up. It is propelling LGBT concerns from the margin to the center. It connects community to create change.

Performing Acts

Gay Freedom Band Los Angeles

Vox Femina Los Angeles:
Vox Femina gives women voice through the performance of quality choral literature. Diverse in culture, age, race, belief and sexual identity, we are a chorus committed to commissioning new works and raising awareness about issues that affect us as a family of women. Through music, we aim to create a world that affirms the worth and dignity of every person.

Health Resources

Top Ten Things Lesbians Should Discuss with Their Healthcare Provider

 

 

Gay and Bisexual Men's Resources

Education and Information

The 2007 National School Climate Survey:
The experiences of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Youth in Our Nation's Schools

Communities

City of West Hollywood

The Backlot:
The Backlot covers Hollywood and mainstream popular culture viewed from a gay guy's perspective. In addition to entertainment commentary by our sitty writers, we being exclusive celebrity interview, hot photo shoots, film reviews, TV recaps, original video and more.

The Community of LGBT Centers:
CenterLink was founded in 1994 as a member-based coalition to support the development of strong, sustainable LGBT community centers. The organization plays an important role in supporting the growth of LGBT centers and addressing the challenges they face, by helping them to improve their organizational and service delivery capacity and increase access to public resources.

One Archives:
This website is for the independent, community-partner of ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at the USC Libraries, the largest repository of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) materials in the world.

Gay & Lesbian Chamber of Commerce (LAGLCC):
The LAGLCC is a 501(c)(6) organization of gay, lesbain, bisexual, transgender and gay-allied businesses, professionals, and individuals, who have joined together to effect positive growth in ourselves, our work, our community and our future.

Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Scientists:
LAGLS provides a friendly, supportive social environment to technoqueers at meetings, field trips and special events; previously monthly, now 2-4 times a years. 

Outdoor Activities

LA Pride

Varsity Gay League

WeHo Aquatics

Los Angeles Frontrunner:
Is a running and walking club for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people (LGBT) and their friends and supports. We welcome runners and walkers of all levels, ethnic backgrounds and sexual identities.

Different Strokoes Southern California:
This club was founded in 1983 to promote cycling activities among members and friends of the gay and lesbian communities in Southern California. We offer a wide variety of road and mountain bike rides, ranging from easy to advanced, throughout the greater Los Angeles Area.

The Greater Los Angeles Softball Association:
The league is open to anyone regardless of race, creed, gender, religion, and sexual orientation. The focus of the league is geared to reach out to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender persons for them to engage in competitive sports.

Great Outdoors Los Angeles:
Great Outdoors is a non-profit, all-volunteer gay and lesbian organization dedicated to the enjoyment of outdoor recreation. We are the largest gay outdoor recreational organization in Southern California and include chapters in Los Angeles, Santa Barbara, Orange County/Long Beach, Palm Springs and San Diego.

Gay and Lesbian Sierrans:
GLS is an official activity section of the Sierra Club and fosters the purposes of the Sierra Club by making available a wide range of events for gays, lesbians and their friends and family. 

Advocacy Organizations

Advocates for Youth:
Advocates for Youth champions efforts to help young people make informed and responsible decisions about their reproductive and sexual health. Advocates believes it can best serve the field by boldly advocating for a more positive and realistic approach to adolescent sexual health.

GLMA - Health Professionals Advancing LGBT Equality:
GLMA is the world's largest and oldest association of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) healthcare professionals.

Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network (GLSEN):
We conduct extensive and original research to inform our evidence-based solutions for K-12 education. We author developmentally appropriate resources for educators to use throughout their school community. We partner with decision makers to ensure that comprehensive and inclusive safe schools policies are considered,passed and implemented. We partner with dozens of national eudcation organizations and empower student to affect change.

The Center Long Beach:
As a central core of the Greater Long Beach LGBTQ communities we offer assistance and provide education about emotional and physical health, housing, cultural and social activities, and legal and social justice. We advocate for the inclusion of all with no judgment or restrictions based on sexual orientation or gender identity.

Matthew Shepard Foundation:
The Foundation was founded by Dennis and Judy Shepard in memory of their 21-year-old son, Matthew, who was murdered in an anti-gay hate crime in Wyoming in October 1998. Created to honor his memory, the Foundation seeks to "Replace Hate with Understanding, Compassion, & Acceptance" through its varied educational, outreach and advocacy programs.

National Gay and Lesbian Task Force:
The Task Force creates change by building LGBT political power from the ground up. It is propelling LGBT concerns from the margin to the center. It connects community to create change.

Gay-Straight Alliance Network (GSAN):
A national youth leadership organization that connects school-based Gay-Straight Alliances to each other and community resources through peer support, leadership development, and training.

Faith-Specific

Buddhism

Gay Buddhist Fellowship:
The Gay Buddhist Fellowship supports Buddhist practice in the Gay men's community. It is a forum that brings together the diverse Buddhist traditions to address the spiritual concerns of Gay men in the San Francisco Bay Area, the United States and the world. GBF's mission includes cultivating a social enivornment that is inclusive and caring.

Family Resources

The Popluck Club:
A Los Angeles Organization of gay dads, prospective dads and their families

Performing Arts

Gay Men's Chorus of Los Angeles (GMCLA):
To create musical experiences that strengthen our role as a leader among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) and performing arts organizations, enrich our membership-artists, support LGBT youth, challenge homophobia, and expose new communities to our message of equality.

Freedom Band Los Angeles:
Founded in 1978 as the Great Ameriacn Yankee Freedom Band of Los Angeles to provide entertainment at pride celebrations, the mission of the Freem Band Foundation today is to promote the performing arts and bring together divergent communities through the performance and experience of music.


 

Asexual Resources

Communities

The Asexuality and Visibility Network (AVEN):

This organization hosts the world's largest online asexual community and has a large archive with resources on asexuality. They seek to create an open and honest discussion about asexuality between asexual and sexual people alike. Good site if new to asexuality and want to learn more.

Ace Socal:

An online group for asexuals living in Southern California

AsexualGroups:
Asexual Facebook groups and websites for in-person meet-ups

Educational Materials

Asexuality 101:

Transcending Boundaries’ Guide to Asexuality

Terminology:
Words and concepts often used in asexual communities

Apositive:

This site was developed in order to break down new ground in talks related to asexuality and sexuality. They track the latest research regarding asexuality in the fields of biology and sociology by looking at the clutural implications of an asexual demographic. People of all orientations are welcome to join.

The Asexual Agenda:
A forum dedicated to giving resources and building (online) community

Asexuality Archive:
Educational information on asexuality

Love from the Asexual Underground Blog:

A blog dedicated to giving the asexual perspective on love, sex, and romance and other topics.

Advocacy Organizations

Partnership for Asexual Visibility and Education:
An advocacy group dedicated to distributing information about upcoming campaigns, events, and opportunities for engagement. They also focus on creating opportunities for aces and allies to get hands-on experience advocating for asexual issues and develop leadership to ensure the future of our movement.

Relationship Resources

How to Have Sex with an Asexual Person:

An in-depth guide for how to safely approach sex with an asexual person, including both casual sex and sex in the context of a romantic relationship. As such it doesn't focus on physical techniques, but more on setting up a good frame for such interactions to go as smoothly as possible.

Research

Asexuality Studies:

This online forum provides sources and links to current research taking place on the subject of asexuality.

Asexual Exploration:

A website made to promote academic studies on asexuality. It helps people find scholarly articles on research conducted and lists sources.


 

Leather and Kink Community Resources

So What is BDSM?
*Not Safe For Work.* A detailed description what BDSM is, what it consists of, and myths surrounding the lifestyle.

Submissive Guide:
Ran by lunaKM, a full-time slave in an M/s relationship, this site is dedicated to helping submissives understand themselves and the service they wish to provide: from sexual to domestic and everything in between.

Dominant Guide:
Dominant Guide is developed in line with the successful submissive site - Submissive Guide. Using that site as a guide, so to speak, Dominant Guide hopes to help the many Dominants out there get the same sort of advice, useful knowledge and community.

So You Want to Try Being a BDSM Top:
An Autostraddle article briefly describing what goes into topping in BDSM. As an opinion piece, it is not exhaustive and should be treated as a stepping stone as you begin to navigate and explore your journey into the lifestyle.

Communities

Avatar Club Los Angeles:
This is the website of Avatar Club Los Angeles, Inc., a non-profit organization providing information and education about safe, sane, and consensual bondage, discipline, kinky and sadomasochistic (BDSM) sex between adults.

 

FetLife:
FetLife is a free social network for the BDSM and fetish commuity.

Los Angeles Leather Coalition:
LALC is a non-profit 501(c)4 organization which facilitates communications and mutual understanding among different segments of the leather-affiliated community, as well as promotes unity through cooperative endeavors that offer entertainment, education, social interaction, and community service.

Threshold:
Threshold Society is a Los Angeles BDSM / Leather Club located in North Hollywood. It is a non-profit (501.c) social organization concerned with exploring and enjoying the world of bondage, discipline, sado-masochism and related activities. They are active in the local community, and Threshold is considered the first place for those who are interested in the BDSM lifestyle to explore.

Kink-Specific

Rope Bondage

Two Knotty Boys:
Dan and JD aim to demystify rope bondage and to provide instruction for safe, functional and aesthetically pleasing ties for the bedroom and beyond.

Relationship and Partner Resources

 


 

Disability Resources

UC and Campus-Specific Resources

Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD)
Their services are designed to meet the unique educational needs of regularly enrolled students with documented permanent and temporary disabilities.

UCLA Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS):

In addition to individual services, CAPS provides a range of programs to promote mental health, emotional resilience and wellness throughout the campus community. Appointments can be made in person or over the phone by calling (310)825-0768.

To meet with a counselor, please schedule a 15 minute screening appointment and ask for a therapist who specializes in gender identity concerns.  Alternatively, you can contact the following counselors directly to set up an appointment:

Amanda di Bartolomeo - adibartolomeo@caps.ucla.edu
Saeromi Kim - skim@caps.ucla.edu
Dee Chappelear - dchappelear@caps.ucla.edu

Education and Information

Bent:

An online magazine ran by gay disabled men. They stopped writing in 2007, but all of their issues are online.

Queerability:
Queerability seeks to increase visibility of LGBTQ disabled people by honoring the intersection of the disability and LGBTQ experience. Queerability was founded by Kristen Guin, In addition to her work with Queerability, she is also a chapter leader for the Autistic Self Advocacy Network.

Leaving Evidence:

A blog detailing Mia Mingus’ experiences as a self-identified queer, physically disabled Corean woman transracial and transnational adoptee who is also a writer, community educator, and organizer working for disability justice and transformative responses to child sexual abuse.

Sexuality and People with Intellectual, Developmental and Other Disabilities:

A special issue of the publication Impact. Its articles cover topics ranging from sexuality education in the home and school, to personal stories of dating and marriage, to legal and ethical issues for staff and agencies providing services for people with disabilities. It is written for people with disabilities, family members and professionals.

Eli Clare:

Thought-provoking, compassionate, and challenging, Eli will enliven your classroom, fire up your conference, educate your department or agency, and empower student and grassroots activists. Bring him to your community or campus to teach, speak, read, facilitate, or train.

Communities

Queer Disability:

This listserv is for the discussion of Queer/Disability issues. We are focused on the development of ideas, challenging existing norms, and providing much needed information for the Q/D community. This list is not a personal support group.

Advocacy Organizations

Reach Out USA:

ReachOut USA focuses on the intersection between disability and LGBT (gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender) concerns. ReachOut USA seeks to influence the disability community to be more responsive to LGBT individuals, and at the same time it seeks to influence LGBT individuals and organizations to be more accountable to people who have disabilities.

Sex-Related Resources

Queerability - Disability and Sexuality Resources:
Queerability seeks to increase visibilty of LGBTQ disabled people by honoring the intersection of the disability and LGBTQ. This post provides an extensive list of sex resources for various disabilities.

Come as You Are:
Online store that sells sex toys and other things to make sex even better. They have done a lot of work on being inclusive to people with disabilities.

The Ultimate Guide to Sex and Disability by Miriam Kaufman:

The first complete sex guide for people who live with disabilities, pain, illness, or chronic conditions. Useful for absolutely everyone, regardless of age, gender, or sexual orientation, the book addresses a wide range of disabilities—from chronic fatigue, back pain, and asthma to spinal cord injury, hearing and visual impairment, multiple sclerosis, and more.

Disability-Specific

Attention Deficit Disorder/Hyperactivity Disorders

GLBT-Attention Deficit Disorder (GLBT-ADD):

A safe social, supportive, and informative group for members and friends of the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community affected by or interested in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

Blindness or Low Vision

Blind-Gay:

The Blind Gay list is a list for blind or visually impaired gay and bisexual men only. If you want to meet other blind or visually impaired gay or bisexual men, talk about problems your having, talk about gay life in general, or anything else, this is the list for you. Keep in mind that there are topics which may be deemed inappropriate for some. No one under the age of 18 may join this group.

Blind LGBT Pride International  (formerly known as BFLAG):

The purpose of Blind LGBT Pride is to provide for the betterment of the lives of those who are visually impaired and who are LGBT By providing a forum for the views and concerns of visually impaired persons interested in issues facing those who are LGBT.

Deaf/Hard of Hearing

Deaf Queer:

A national nonprofit resource and information center for, by and about the Deaf Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Transsexual, Intersex and Questioning communities.

Rainbow Alliance of the Deaf:

The purpose of this Alliance is to establish and maintain a society of Deaf GLBT to encourage and promote the educational, economical, and social welfare; to foster fellowship; to defend our rights; and advance our interests as Deaf GLBT citizens concerning social justice; to build up an organization in which all worthy members may participate in the discussion of practical problems and solutions related to their social welfare.

Speech and Language Disability

Passing Twice:

An informal network of gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender stutterers and their friends.

Performing Arts

Axis Dance Company:

One of the world’s most acclaimed and innovative ensembles of performers with and without disabilities. Through the outreach programs AXIS brings physically integrated dance outside the studio and into schools, community centers, independent living centers, and to countless organizations seeking to learn more about dance, disability and collaboration.

Sin Invalid:

A performance project on disability and sexuality that incubates and celebrates artists with disabilities, centralizing artists of color and queer and gender-variant artists as communities who have been historically marginalized from social discourse.


 

Resources for Family and Partners of LGBTQ Students

Education and Information

Gender Neutral/Queer Relationship Titles:
A list of family and romantic gender neutral titles.

Opening the Straight Spouses' Closet

Our Daughters and Sons: Questions and Answers for Parents of Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual People (For Spanish >> click here)

Faith in Our Families: Parents, Families and Friends Talk About Religion and Homosexuality 

Communities

The Popluck Club:
The mission of The Pop Luck Club is to advance the well being of gay prospective parents, gay parents and their children. We do this through mutual support, community collaboration, and public understanding.

Advocacy Organizations

Family Acceptance Project:
The Family Acceptance Project is a research, intervention, education and policy initiative that works to descreas health and mental health risks for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) children and youth, including suicide, homelessness and HIV - in the context of their families.

Family Equality Council:
Family Equality Council works to ensure equality for LGBT families by building community, changing hearts and minds, and advancing social justice for all families.

Gender Spectrum:
Gender Spectrum provides education, training and support to help create a gender sensitive and inclusive environment for all children and teens.

HRC - All Families - LGBT Resources for Child Welfare

L.A. Gay and Lesbian Center - Family Services:
By helping LGBT-parented families share commonalities and learn about differences, Family Services helps build a stronger community, one family at a time.

Parents, Families and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG):
PFLAG was founded to help parents, families and friends of LGBT persons to support each other and their loved ones.

UCLA Parent & Family Programs:
The Office of Parent & Family Programs is committed to helping you participate in your student's experience at UCLA. We believe an informed, supportive family plays an instrumental role in a student's educational success.

Health-Related

Family Acceptance Project:
The Family Acceptance Project™ works to decrease major health and related risks for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) youth, such as suicide, substance abuse, HIV and homelessness – in the context of their families.

LA County LGBT Child Abuse Prevention Council:
Promote the safety and well-being of LGBTQ youth and children in Los Angeles County, and facilitate their transition to early adulthood by educating communities, parents, families, caregivers, and mandated reporters about sexual orientation and gender identity.

Trans-Specific

TransFamily:
A support group for transgender and transsexual people, their parents, partners, children, other family members, friends, and supportive others. We provide referrals, literature, and over-the-phone information on all transgender issues.

Gender Justice LA:
Gender Justice LA is building a strong grassroots multi-racial coalition of transgender people and allies to advocate for our rights, win concrete improvements in our lives, and challenge oppression.

Financial Resources

LGBTQ Scholarships

Financial Aid for LGBTQ Students » click here

Point Foundation » click here

Collins Higgins Foundation » click here

Colage Lee Dubin Scholarship Fund » click here

PFLAG Scholarship Program » click here

Zami Audre-Lorde Scholarship Fund » click here

Transgender Scholarship and Educational Legacy Fund » click here

GLBT Scholarship Resources » click here

AT&T League Foundation » click here

***Courtesy of Joey at the Point Foundation, HERE is list of additional scholarships.

 

Health Resources

UC and Campus-Specific Resources

Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD)
Their services are designed to meet the unique educational needs of regularly enrolled students with documented permanent and temporary disabilities.

UCLA Arthur Ashe Student Health and Wellness Center:
All registered students can access medical services at The Ashe Center including Primary Care, Women's Health, Immunizations, Physical Therapy, Specialists, Optometry, Pharmacy, Laboratory, Radiology, Acupuncture, and Massge. Students can make appointments online or by phone at 310-825-4073. All services provided are confidential as students are protected under FERPA regulations.

UCLA Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS):

In addition to individual services, CAPS provides a range of programs to promote mental health, emotional resilience and wellness throughout the campus community. Appointments can be made in person or over the phone by calling (310)825-0768.

To meet with a counselor, please schedule a 15 minute screening appointment and ask for a therapist who specializes in gender identity concerns.  Alternatively, you can contact the following counselors directly to set up an appointment:

Amanda di Bartolomeoadibartolomeo@caps.ucla.edu
Saeromi Kimskim@caps.ucla.edu
Dee Chappeleardchappelear@caps.ucla.edu

Education and Information

DrugWatch:
Drugwatch.com is a comprehensive resource about dangerous side effects and complications from commonly prescribed drugs and oft-used medical devices. Our mission is to educate people about medications they take and the devices that are in their bodies and then to provide resources to help people evaluate whether they have a legal case because of life-shanging side effects or complications.

GLMA:
Top 10 Things Transgender Persons Should Disucess with their Healthcare Provider

National Eating Disorders Association:
Information on eating disorders within the LGBTQ community.

Communities

The Southern California Lambda Medical Association (SCLMA):
SCLMA is a professional organization with a mission to provide support for gay, lesbain, bisexual and transgender physicians and physicians-in-training through networking, social, and educational opportunities. Our group hosts monthly events or meetings, publishes and provides physician referrals, and offers scholarships to medical students.

Mental Health

The Lesbian and Gay Psychotherapy Association of Southern California (LAGPA):
LAGPA's purpose is to facilitate social and professional networking for mental health professionals in the greater Los Angeles area. LAGPA seeks to join such individuals together for academic and scial events, to develop educational community outreach activities, to foster and promote a positive LGBT identity and to serve as role models for all members of the LGBT community.

Advocacy Organizations

Association of Gay and Lesbian Psychiatrists (AGLP):
AGLP is an independent organization from the American Psychiatric Association, but works closely with APA through LGBT representation on the APA Assembly (the LGB Caucus of the APA).

Healthcare Equality Index:
The HEI is a unique and invaluable resource for healthcare organizations seeking to provide equitable, inclusive care to LGBT Americans--and for LGBT Americans seeking healthcare organizations with a demostrated commitment to their care.

The National Minority AIDS Council (NMAC):
NMAC develops leadership in communities of color to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Since 1987, NMAC has advanced this mission through a variety of programs and services, including: a public policy education, national and regional training conferences, a treatment and research program, numerous electronic and materials and a website.

HIV/AIDS Information

*Information below adapted from Healthline.com* 

visit http://www.healthline.com/health/hiv-aids/effects-on-body for a visual infographic

Effects of HIV/AIDS on the Body

The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seeks and destroys CD4+ cells, a type of T lymphocyte (T cell). T cells are critical to the immune system. They’re responsible for warding off diseases and most infections, including viral infections.

HIV targets the type of cells that would normally fight off an invader like HIV. As the virus replicates, it damages or destroys the infected CD4+ cell and produces more virus to infect more CD4+ cells. Without treatment, this cycle continues in most infected people until the immune system is badly compromised, leaving them open to many serious infections and illnesses. Many of the illnesses that people compromised immune systems get are rare in people with functioning immune systems.

How quickly the virus progresses varies from person to person. Factors like your age, overall health, and how quickly you’re diagnosed and treated can make a difference.

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is the final stage of HIV. At this stage, the immune system is severely weakened, and the risk of contracting opportunistic infections is much greater. Not everyone with HIV will go on to develop AIDS.

Importantly, many of the effects described here are related to the failure of the immune system in progressing HIV and AIDS. Many of these effects are preventable with early antiretroviral treatment, which can preserve the immune system. However, for anyone without access to effective antiretroviral treatment, these effects remain possible.

Immune System

Your immune system prevents your body from acquiring the diseases and infections that come your way. White blood cells defend you against viruses, bacteria, and other organisms that can make you sick.

When HIV enters the body, it goes straight for the CD4+ T cells that are a lynchpin for the operation of the entire immune system. As the virus infects and kills more of these T cells, your immune system grows weaker, and you become more susceptible to illness.

Early on, symptoms may be mild enough to be dismissed. Within a few months of becoming infected, most people experience a flu-like sickness that lasts a few weeks. Symptoms may include:

  • fever
  • chills
  • night sweats
  • diarrhea
  • headache
  • muscle aches
  • joint pain
  • sore throat
  • rash
  • swollen lymph glands
  • mouth or genital ulcers

The first stage of HIV is called the acute infection stage. The virus reproduces rapidly at this stage. You may not have much in the way of serious symptoms, but there are usually large quantities of virus in your blood.

Many people are unaware of their HIV status at this point, but the risk of transmission during the acute infection stage is very high. Acute infection may cause flu-like symptoms, including decreased appetite, headache, night sweats, and others.

The next stage is called the clinical latent infection state. On average, it lasts 8 to 10 years. In some cases, it lasts much longer than that. You may or may not have symptoms during this stage.

As the virus advances, CD4 count decreases more drastically. This can lead to symptoms like:

  • fatigue
  • shortness of breath
  • cough
  • fever
  • swollen lymph nodes
  • weight loss
  • diarrhea

If HIV infection advances to AIDS, the body becomes prone to opportunistic infections. People with advanced HIV/AIDS are at increased risk of a number of infections, including a herpes virus called cytomegalovirus. It can cause problems with your eyes, lungs, and digestive tract.

Kaposi’s sarcoma, another possible infection, is a cancer of the blood vessel walls. It’s rare among the general population, but common in people who are HIV-positive. Symptoms include red or dark purple lesions on the mouth and skin. It can also cause problems in the lungs, digestive tract, and other internal organs.

HIV/AIDS also puts you at higher risk of developing lymphomas. An early sign of lymphoma is swollen lymph nodes.

Respiratory and Cardiovascular Systems

HIV increases the risk of colds, influenza, and pneumonias. According to the American Lung Association, HIV/AIDS can lead to opportunistic lung diseases. Without preventive treatment, people with advanced HIV are susceptible to tuberculosis, pneumonia, and a disease called pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP). PCP causes trouble breathing, cough, and fever.

HIV raises the risk of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). PAH s a type of high blood pressure in the arteries that supply the lungs. It puts added strain on the heart.

If you have HIV and have become immunocompromised (have a low T cell count), you’re susceptible to tuberculosis (TB), a leading cause of death in people who have AIDS. TB is an airborne bacterium that affects the lungs. Symptoms include chest pain and a bad cough that may contain blood or phlegm. Symptoms can linger for months.

Digestive System

A common HIV-related infection is called candidiasis. Symptoms include inflammation of and a white film on the tongue. It can also cause inflammation of the esophagus, which can make it difficult to eat. Another viral infection that affects the mouth is oral hairy leukoplakia, which causes white lesions on the tongue.

Salmonella infection is spread through contaminated food or water and causes diarrhea, abdominal pain, and vomiting. Anyone can get it, but if you have HIV, you’re at higher risk of serious complications from this infection.

Consuming contaminated food or water can also result in a parasitic intestinal infection called cryptosporidiosis. It affects the bile ducts and intestines. It can be particularly severe and cause chronic diarrhea in people who have AIDS. Cryptosporidiosis infection can occur in people with effective immune systems, but it can become a chronic problem in people with CD4 levels under 200.

HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN) is when the filters in your kidneys become inflamed, making it harder to remove waste products from your bloodstream.

Problems with your digestive tract can decrease your appetite and make it difficult to eat properly. Weight loss is a common side effect of HIV.

Central Nervous System

There are significant neurological complications of AIDS. Even though HIV doesn’t generally directly infect nerve cells, it does infect the cells that support and surround nerves in the brain and throughout the body.

All of the mechanisms of HIV-associated neurologic damage aren’t completely understood, but it’s likely that infection of these support cells contribute to nerve injury. Advanced HIV infection can damage nerves (neuropathy). Small holes in the conducting sheaths of peripheral nerve fibers (vacuolar myelopathy) can cause pain, weakness, and difficulty walking.

HIV/AIDS can cause HIV-associated dementia or AIDS dementia complex, two conditions that seriously affect cognitive function.

Toxoplasma encephalitis is another possible complication of advanced HIV. People with AIDS are at increased risk of inflammation of the brain and spinal cord due to this parasite found commonly in cat feces. Symptoms include confusion, headaches, and seizures.

Some common complications of AIDS include memory impairment, anxiety, and depression. In very advanced cases, hallucinations and frank psychosis can occur. Some people experience headaches, balance issues, and vision problems.

Skin

One of the more obvious signs of HIV/AIDS can be seen on the skin. A weakened immune response leaves you more vulnerable to viruses like herpes. Herpes can cause you to develop sores around your mouth or genitals.

People with HIV are at increased risk of shingles, which is caused by herpes zoster, the virus that gives you chickenpox. Symptoms of shingles include a painful rash, often with blisters.

A viral skin infection called molluscum contagiosum involves an outbreak of bumps on the skin. Another condition is called prurigo nodularis. It causes crusted lumps on the skin, as well as severe itching.


- See more at: http://www.healthline.com/health/hiv-aids/effects-on-body#sthash.Gbfi613s.dpuf 

Legal Services

UC and Campus-Specific Resources

UCLA Student Legal Services:
We provide confidential legal counseling and assistance regarding a wide range of legal issues to all currently registered and enrolled UCLA students.

Advocacy Organizations

American Civil Liberties Union:
The ACLU is our nation's guardian of liberty, working daily in courts, legislatures and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties that the Constitution and laws of the United States guarantee everyone in this country.

Lambda Legal:
Lambda legal is a national organization committed to achieving full recognition of the civil rights of lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, transgender people and those with HIV through impact litigation, education and public policy work.

Lesbian & Gay Lawyers Association of Los Angeles:
In exercising our strength as a Bar Association, our mission is to provide a strong leadership presence of and for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender persons in the legal profession and in the community at large, through education, legal advocacy, and participation in political and civic activities and social functions.

Immigration Resources

Immigration Equality:
Based in New York City and Washington D.C., Immigration Equality is the national leader in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and HIV immigration rights. We helped end the HIV travel ban, and we led the successful fight to secure green cards for LGBT families.

Veteran Resources

Out Serve SLDN:
Mission: OutServe-SLDN empowers, supports, and defends the Department of Defense and military service LGBT community, LGBT veterans, and their families, while working to strengthen out military's culture of inclusion.

Workplace Resources

Out & Equal Workplace Advocates:
Out & Equal is committed to ending employment discrimination for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender employees.

Religious Resources

Education and Information

Living Openly in Your Place of Worship

Buddhism

Gay Buddhist Fellowship:
The Gay Buddhist Fellowship supports Buddhist practice in the Gay men's community. It is a forum that brings together the diverse Buddhist traditions to address the spiritual concerns of Gay men in the San Francisco Bay Area, the United States and the world. GBF's mission includes cultivating a social environment that is inclusive and caring.

Catholicism

DignityUSA - Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Catholics:
DignityUSA works for respect and justice for people of all sexual orientations, genders, and gender identities--especially gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender persons--in the Catholic Church and the world through education, advocacy, and support.

Integrity:
Intergrity is a nonprofit organization of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Episcopalians and oour straight friends. Since our founding by Dr. Louie Crew in rural Georgia in 1974, Integrity has been the leading grassroots voice for the full inclusion of LGBT persons in the Episcopal Church and our equal access to its rites. However, edvocacy is only one facet of our ministry.

Christian Denominations

Adventism

Seventh-day Adventist Kinship:
SDA Kinship is a diverse worldwide community of individuals who have participated in the Adventist community and have felt ostracized by church leaders, administrators, or members because of their sexual orientation or gender variation, their support for family or friends, or their convictions about equality and justice.

Baptist

Association of Welcoming & Affirming Baptists:
AWAB is made up of a growing number of member churches, affiliated organizations, and individuals willing to go on record as welcoming and affirming of all persons without regard to sexual orientation or gender identity. These organizations and individuals have joined together to adovcate for the full inclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender persons within Baptist communities of faith.

Rainbow Baptists:
Rainbow Baptists is a website providing support, information and advocacy for gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender and queer-identitied Baptists, their family and friends. This is an outreach ministry of AWAB.

Brethren and Mennonites

Brethren Mennonite Council for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Interests:
The mission of BMC is to cultivate an inclusive church and society and to care for the Mennonite and Brethren lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and allied community.

Christian Scientist

Emergence International:
Emergence is a worldwide community of Christian Scientists, their families and friends providing spiritual and educational support for lesbians, gay man, bisexuals and transgender individuals as they deal with homophobia and heterosexism.

Methodist

Affirmation - United Methodists:
Affirmation is an independent voice of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and queer people and our supporters. We are an activist, all-volunteer, not-for-profit organization that challenges The United Methodist Church to be inclusive, and radically speaks out against injustice for LGBTQ people around the world.

Mormon

Affirmation:
Lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals from every background and situation, united in the shared experience of a spiritual and/or cultural heritage in the Chruch of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 

Pentecostal

Fellowship of Reconciling Pentecostals International:
The RPI is a network of Pentecostal ministers, churches, and ministries which seeks by means of the full gospel of Jesus Christ to reconcile all repentant people to God without regard to race, gender, political persuasion, economic or educational status, sexual orientation, nationality, religious affiliation, or any other thing that divides.

Presbyterian

More Light Presbyterians:
Following the risen Christ, and seeking to make the Church a true community of hospitality, the mission of More Light Presbyterians is to work for the full participation of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) people in the life, ministry and witness of the Presbyterian Church (USA) and in society.

Judaism

The World Congress of Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Jew:
Keshet Ga'avah consists of around 50 member organizations in Argentina, Australia, Canada, Chile, France, Israel, Mexico, The Netherlands, United Kingsom and the United States. The World Congress holds conferences and workshops representing the interests of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Jews around the world. The focus of these sessions varies from regional, national, continental, to global.

Congregation Kol Ami: Congregation Kol Ami is a progressive, Reform congregation rooted in rich Jewish tradition, very welcoming to non-Jews who are curious about an LGBTQI-friendly place in Hollywood, with commitment to social justice, Israel and diversity. Come join us for vibrant Shabbat services every Friday! 1200 N. La Brea Ave., West Hollywood, CA 90038 | 323.606.0996 | www.kol-ami.org | facebook.com/kolamiweho

Non-Denominational

The Gay Christian Network:
GCN works to strengthen each individual's relationship with God, first through helping people reconcile their faith and sexuality when necessary, but then moving beyond that to promote ongoing spiritual growth as they continue their walk with Christ. A person who is growing in Christ is better able to live out His light and love with others.

The Fellowship:
The Fellowship is a coalition of Christian churches and ministries which recognize the need for networking, accountability, fellowship and resource faciilitation. The mission is to become a catalytic resources agent for the unity and support of churches and ministries who desire to celebrate and proclaim the radically inclusive love of Jesus Christ.

Metropolitan Community Churches:
Since its founding in 1968, MCC has been at the vanguard of civil and human rights movements by addressing important issues such as racism, sexism, homophobia, ageism, and other forms of oppression. MCC has been on the forefront in the struggle towards marriage equality in the US and other countries worldwide and continues to be a powerful voice in the LGBT equality movement.

UCC Coalition For LGBT Concerns:
The UCC Coalition advocates for the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community in the UCC, and equips UCC congregations to become effective witnesses to Christ's extravagant welcome.

Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations:
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer Ministries (LGBTQ Ministries) is guided by the vision that someday we will be able to put ourselves out of business and that oppression against people of all ages, abilities, colors, and economic classes who are marginalized on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity--whether the oppression be overt or subtle--will be a thing of the past.

Check out these videos by Chancellor Gene Block and student leaders!